There are quite a few natural life forms here in the Yucatan that I have managed to photograph:  birds, insects and animals.  I have frequently found iguanas emerging from piles of rocks or from crevices in walls to bask in the warmth of the sun.  This fellow had his cheeks puffed out, something I had not seen previously in my wandering through the countryside with the camera.  My first thoughts were that this likely had to do with searching for a mate, for the feminine.

Ouroboros – is an ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail.

Looking at the iguana in the photograph back on my computer after the walk, I thought of urobos, the lizard who tries to consume himself, to feed himself, to somehow become transformed.  And then as I looked at the head, I had a fleeting thought that it resembled a penis.  A penis in search of nourishment, in search of nourishing, in search of the feminine.

Ouroboros is an ancient symbol depicting a serpent or dragon eating its own tail. Originating in ancient Egyptian iconography, the ouroboros entered western tradition via Greek magical tradition and was adopted as a symbol in Gnosticism and Hermeticism and most notably in alchemy.  Swiss psychologist Carl Jung saw the ouroboros as an archetype and the basic mandala of alchemy. Jung also defined the relationship of the ouroboros to alchemy.  And so now, the Ouroboros is a dramatic symbol for the integration and assimilation of the opposite,  the shadow.